Community-Based Change Principles: Core Practices
Volume XV | Issue 2 | Fall 2015
Cover Story

Putting a new focus on community efforts

In July, Ford Institute Director Roque Barros and Associate Director Max Gimbel met with a community action team in Ontario. The group had identified 10 priorities after a Ford Institute partner-led Alumni Celebration. After deliberation, the group decided to move ahead with a family recreation center. They had already drafted a 90-day work plan, which included a pledge to listen to 1,000 community residents. Roque asked them: “What role would you like the Institute to play?” Their response: “Come back in October to look at our community-listening results, help us consider next steps, and celebrate the work done to date.” In the meantime, the community would do the work. This group action in Ontario serves as a real-life example of Community-Based Change. 

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Community Vitality is published twice a year (in a printed format and online) for community leaders by The Ford Family Foundation.

Anne Kubisch, President; Nora Vitz Harrison, Editor; Megan Monson, Assistant Editor

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