The Deepest Well

Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity

This book looks at how childhood stress can lead to lifelong health problems and what we can do about it. The author delivers both scientific insight, including the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Study, and moving stories. She pulls material from research labs and her own pediatric practice to describe the problem and inspire change. Be sure to check out her TED Talk.
251 pages. ©2018.
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Reader Reviews for this Book

jjaylynny

Review posted May 20, 2019

5

An important book about childhood adversity and trauma. It delineates, in a readable and accessible voice, how the ACES scores came about. The author is a pediatrician, as am I, and was able to make the story applicable to me in my job. I wish use of the ACE scores were used more universally. And I wish there was more discussion (maybe it's because more work must be done in this area) regarding how to treat/mitigate the effects of trauma in kids/adults with high scores.

aowen

Review posted May 14, 2019

5

Highly recommend! It is Interesting with great insight of how the brain works and effects of trauma on the brain.

Nwillard

Review posted May 13, 2019

2

I chose this book because of my work in bullying prevention. The experience of being seriously or persistently bullied is the experience of trauma/toxic stress. However, the relationship is far deeper. Frequently, students who have experienced trauma are the targets of bullying by other students and also by school staff members. Unfortunately, a common behavior management approach used in Oregon schools is premised on the mistaken belief that students are misbehaving to obtain attention and that by giving rewards to students who have not experienced trauma, this will motivate the students who have experienced trauma to behave. All this does is shame and exclude those students who have experienced trauma. Other students then model this shaming and exclusion. The other challenge is that students who have experienced trauma may be hurtful to others either to seek to achieve some level of personal power or they have triggered because someone was hurtful to them. They are then most likely to be the ones suspended -- shamed and excluded. I asked to receive The Deepest Well as this is a book on trauma being provided by a foundation that is wisely seeking to increase trauma informed practices in Oregon. There were some aspects of this book that were good. It was well written and engaging. The manner in which Harris extended the ACE questionnaire to include other traumatic events, including bullying, is excellent. However, overall I found the book to be lacking. The explanation of the neurological aspects of the experience of trauma was light and there was far too little focus on strategies to assist both young people and adults in achieving greater resilience in the face of experiencing such trauma. While the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard was mentioned, much of their excellent guidance on strategies to assist young people in achieving greater resilience was not detailed. There was no mention of the excellent research insight that falls into a "bucket" called "positive psychology." Nor was there mention of Collaborative Problem Solving, Self Determination Theory, Restorative Practices -- all of which I consider critically important insight towards the objective of enhancing resilience. The primary focus of the book was the focus on the author's quest to have pediatricians screen for ACEs. The excellent TFFF ACE report by David Mandell, published in 2014, provided greater insight into reasons why such screening is not more fully adopted. The three recommendations in this TFFF report are excellent: 1. It is essential to ask about both sources of concern and sources of resilience. 2. It is not appropriate to be asking about this if the organization is not also well prepared to provide the services and resources necessary to address the concerns. 3. The person asking must be well trained, because asking will likely trigger a traumatic response. I would add a fourth consideration: Screening may not even be necessary. Basically, if young people have the capacity to do well, they generally will. The fact that a young person is demonstrating evidence of experiencing trauma -- hyper vigilance, inability to focus and self-regulation, triggering, challenges in learning and behavior -- then it should be immediately recognized that this young person has experienced or is experiencing trauma/toxic stress. Why should it matter whether this child scores at 4 or 7 on an ACE scale? Is it truly necessary to specifically identify which of the kinds of adversity the young person has or is experiencing to make a decision that this young person and family need a greater level of support? And I would add a fifth: The remedies to the experiences of childhood trauma/toxic stress are for us, as a society, to address the factors that are placing families at greater risk and to implement strategies to assist both young people and their families to gain greater resilience. We do not need to know specifically which families or young people are at greater risk to do this. The approach taken by Harris appeared to be grounded in the idea that screening is necessary to ensure that professionals can step in to help. My perspective is that schools need to ensure that all young people understand these issues and gain effective insight into strategies to achieve resilience so that all young people can recognize when they or a friend or someone they really do not know is having a negative reaction or is acting badly due to the experience of adversity--and how to step in to help. Witnesses who become helpful allies will be able to accomplish much more good than a merely a focus on increasing interventions by professionals. It is my hope that Oregon school will take greater strides in the implementation of trauma informed practices that focus primarily on the efforts necessary to increase staff and student understanding of how trauma/toxic stress impacts the brain and actions and to increase the resilience of all.

Lalena

Review posted May 10, 2019

5

The Deepest Well is a powerful and important book, and a fascinating read. Dr. Nadine Burke Harris describes how childhood trauma affects people not only when they are young, but also affects their health years later. This book is very interesting and should be read by policymakers and citizens alike. Learning how widespread trauma is, the terrible impact it can have on the body, and the destructive effect on people’s health and behavior years later makes one understand the need for programs that seek to reduce stress and trauma in families. It becomes clear that investing in making the lives of children and families better now will not only help them live healthier lives but will benefit society as well, reducing negative behaviors and physical illness that will otherwise result.

sueseubert

Review posted May 7, 2019

5

This book was bittersweet - easy to read due to the personal stories yet difficult to learn about the long-term effects of childhood adversity. They say a good writer is one who causes you to act through their writing - that is what Nadine Burke Harris, M.D. has done - I have recommended this book to a counselor and a first-grade teacher. This book gave me a greater understanding and empathy towards others. Dr. Burke Harris' recommendations to her patients - "sleep, exercise, nutrition, mindfulness, mental health, and healthy relationships" are key not only for children but just as important for adults I also share with others. Beautifully written, authentic, and true.

Jmays

Review posted April 23, 2019

4

An important book in understanding the beginnings of trauma-informed practices.

mccaskill

Review posted April 23, 2019

5

The deepest well was a thought provoking hopeful book about childhood trauma and healing. It gave me a new way to think about children "acting out". As a former teacher and now a CASA I expect to use my new information often!!

stefiepooh73

Review posted April 22, 2019

4

First hand knowledge of childhood ACEs, the author shares her patient's stories and digs deeper into how adversity and trauma affect our bodies (and minds). Looking in to long-term effects of our own exposures as a child and how this creates havoc on us all. An ACE questionnaire is also provided in the book, helps you look at your childhood experiences.

cramosbgc

Review posted April 22, 2019

5

The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effect of Childhood Adversity provides you with a great narrative around research and application of ACE's by MD Burke Harris. A greater understanding of ACE's provides you with insight into trauma youth face and not only the mental health impacts, but physical ones. She does an amazing job connecting the two. A great read for an introduction on ACE's. Have recommended this book to many!

[email protected]

Review posted April 18, 2019

5

This book provides a great description of the impact of trauma on the bodies and brains of kids and makes a compelling case for ACEs screening in pediatric practices. I have the book and the audiobook, and if you have to choose and don't need to refer back later, I'd suggest the audiobook because it's read by the author so you get a taste of her personality. I almost marked it 4 stars instead of 5 because I wanted more details about the interventions they do after the screening, but perhaps that's a separate book.

onalee Mansor

Review posted April 10, 2019

5

This is an interesting & informative book on the current results of the ACE's study. The author uses real experience and example to support her positive solutions to reverse the effects of early childhood trauma. An excellent read!

[email protected]

Review posted April 8, 2019

5

This book does an amazing job pulling you in and keeping you attention. The authors passion for the topic is evidenced within the writing. Great book, I highly recommend!

[email protected]

Review posted April 7, 2019

4

I found this book very interesting. I work with children in the foster care system of which many are labeled with ADHD. I now have a addition lens to few these children through.

letsbeachit

Review posted April 5, 2019

5

Awesome book! Reviwed what I have already learned, yet I gained lots of new knowlegde

Amanda

Review posted April 4, 2019

4

This was a very powerful book . I was shocked to find out that childhood adversity could impact adult health. The author is insightful and uses a sense of humor to relay this very important information. As a staff member of a Head Start program, I will use this information to help educate parents as to the improtance of early childhood.

amberbroadbent

Review posted March 31, 2019

5

I'm an engineer by training and have no formal education in medicine, public health, mental health, and/or childhood development. This was my first foray into Adverse Childhood Events (ACEs), traumatic stress and the biological and mental health implications of these. Dr. Burke Harris balances the scientific background (i.e. what's going on in the brain/body) as well as the social-emotional aspects and acknowledging the human element in telling her story. I've learned a lot from this book and expect I'll be referencing it frequently as I continue my studies.

Alliberr

Review posted March 31, 2019

4

This book is enjoyable to read. I admire the work the author has done and continues to do. It made the subject of ACES easy to understand. I was hoping for more concrete ideas of things to do in my classroom, this book did not provide those.

stella

Review posted March 29, 2019

5

This is an important work to include in our toolbox for helping our students.

asquires

Review posted March 28, 2019

5

I am a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) and can already see how what I’ve learned from this will make me more effective as an advocate for the foster kids with whom I work. This book has also helped more broadly to help me be more empathetic towards others who have experienced adversity in their lives. I highly recommend this book to everyone, not just those who work with children.

Sbailey711

Review posted March 28, 2019

5

This was a very enlightening book. I’m convinced more than ever (been my battle cry for years) that WE (teachers, therapists, doctors) MUST work as a team. I’m not sure how to make this happen when medical and mental health professionals don’t seem to want to work with is. Pressing kn’

Lisa Battaglia

Review posted March 26, 2019

5

This book is a game-changer. A must read for anyone who grew up "resilient". Know your score- it could save your life!

Janelemar

Review posted March 24, 2019

5

Captivating, brilliant and as medically down to earth as can be. This book spoke to my soul. Every Social Worker in training should read. It’s a little heavy on medical concepts, but sees its way through the process with full circle effects. Stunning book. I’m ordering a copy for each of my partners.

KateEllenRichter

Review posted March 20, 2019

4

Worth the read. Very eye opening and a great, well researched, perspective.

Loverfrombeyond

Review posted March 11, 2019

4

This book is easy to get into and read. It is a good way to look into and help understand the things children in theses situations go through. Good research throughout.

mcneisa

Review posted March 6, 2019

5

This is wonderful reference guide for understanding childhood adversities and effects on the psyche. I recommend to anyone dealing with troubled youth on a regular basis.

saral

Review posted March 3, 2019

5

This was a really interesting read, written in a way that is accessible and interesting to medical professional and lay person alike. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in the topic.

barbhofford

Review posted February 24, 2019

5

As a school nurse I work with MANY children and their families. This book was very helpful in giving me insight into why so many of our students and their families are broken...and hope for helping them. We have a long way to go but I believe we can make a difference in the lives of the families we serve as show compassion and help them find resources to improve their lives.

debbykjones

Review posted February 18, 2019

5

Just what I was looking for. A heartfelt journey that looks inside the reason that answers so many whys. I watched Nadine Burke Harris's Ted Talk but this book is so much more.

Toby Abraham-Rhine

Review posted February 11, 2019

5

Perfect companion book to Dr. Perry’s “The Boy who was Raised as a Dog.” Dr. Nadine Burke Harris writes conversationally, scientifically and emotionally as she lets us in on the journey that has revolutionized the way doctors should approach patients health. Like Dr. Perry, Dr, Burke Harris has been on the forefront of ACEs and the ground-breaking revelation that one’s emotional past and exposure to trauma can have a direct effect on one’s future health and life choices. Another must-read for those of us working daily with children of all ages.

Dhueckman

Review posted February 11, 2019

5

I work in social services and specifically working in the Trauma Informed arena. This book was well written and helped me to gain a better understanding of how important it is to educate others.

El1ana83

Review posted February 8, 2019

5

Really informative and helpful in multiple areas of my life, personal and professional.

Cady Lyon

Review posted February 6, 2019

5

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Learning the background that she went through while connecting the dots, was a wonderful story and insight into the imprinting that childhood adversity can have on our lives.

Shaworth

Review posted January 27, 2019

4

This book is full of great information. I was unaware how A.C.E.S. has such a strong affect on ones health. If you work with children, this is a must read.

kwhitso

Review posted January 21, 2019

4

The Deepest Well outlines extensive research and perspective on the long term consequences of childhood trauma and abuse. Ideas and solutions were provided with new tools for individuals, families, and communities to help heal.

Diana Molina

Review posted January 16, 2019

4

Happy to have the audio version. Great read for those in the social service field.

Shawn Brady

Review posted January 13, 2019

5

I really enjoyed this book. I can see the effects of childhood trauma in my family and how it has affected their physical and mental health. It has made me more aware of those around me. Thank you so very much.

timhutton

Review posted January 7, 2019

5

This book is eye opening at the least. If you are considering ordering it, I suggest you do so quickly. As parents it is a must-read.

cmoan

Review posted January 2, 2019

5

This book provides a masterfully done overview of how adversity and trauma impact children. The first page pulled me in with a gripping story and my attention was held throughout the book as she described how she came to realize the impact that trauma was having on the families she was treating. Very highly recommended, this book could be a must read for everyone.

msevey2013

Review posted December 31, 2018

5

Great resource for welfare career field type.

dougsannes

Review posted December 31, 2018

3

Deep subjects

jeanharman

Review posted December 27, 2018

5

The author of this book details her research and knowledge showing just how deeply our bodies can be imprinted by ACEs—adverse childhood experiences like abuse, neglect, parental addiction, mental illness, and divorce. Childhood adversity changes our biological systems, and lasts a lifetime. This is a book well written and interesting for anyone who has faced a difficult childhood, or who cares about the millions of others who have and will have -- the scientific insight and innovative, acclaimed health interventions in The Deepest Well represent vitally important hope for limiting or preventing lifelong illness and trauma.  
The book offers a new set of tools, based in science, that can help heal ourselves and children. If I could I would rate it 4.5

kyeann196

Review posted December 23, 2018

5

The book, The Deepest Well, by Nadine Burke Harris, MD is a masterpiece. Her medical training combined with keen insight and intuition have lead her on an amazing journey through her career. Very relevant to our troubling times, Dr. Harris offers troubled youth a, as well as adults, a path of hope and concrete direction of action. Her methodologies are backed by sound science and experience. A MUST read! Explains the biological affects of stress on the body, with a special focus of toddlerhood.

mrochfo1

Review posted December 16, 2018

4

Dr. Burke Harris does a great job of summarizing current research into small paragraphs when relevant making it accessible to a broad audience. This book takes the reader through the author's process of learning about the ways stress impacts all communities. It is relevant to health professionals, mental health, teachers, mentors, and anyone dealing with stress. While I would recommend this book, the author spends a great deal of time name dropping others in her field, some of which are financial contributors to her work. I would like to hear more specifics of the beginning finds or examples to best prioritize addressing Adverse Childhood Adversity.

Hollykarbo

Review posted December 13, 2018

3

Excellent book

jpaul

Review posted December 11, 2018

5

The author of this book is so knowledgeable about childhood adversity. The book is written to be very readable, even if you do not have a lot of background on the topic.

[email protected]

Review posted December 11, 2018

4

This is a wonderful exploration of what should be happening for those with high ACEs, both individually and within our institutions. The author/doctor writes with great passion and clarity about discovering key elements of support, starting in the right place: do no harm.

Shannaramiller

Review posted December 5, 2018

4

This was never a subject I would have considered prior to seeing it on the site. It was an amazing perspective and very well written. I would highly recommend this read for anyone working in any type of social service setting or with children.

MMasonma1

Review posted December 5, 2018

5

The Deepest Well was an excellent read, with the perfect mix of science & humanity. I finally understand what all the hype about self care is about & how trauma effects development & our reactions.

DBowling

Review posted December 3, 2018

4

I enjoyed this book very much. It is extremely informative, maybe too much at times, It does deliver some useful information. You can tell the author likes to hear her self talk, and she feels a t bit long winded at times, but the science and research carried out in spot on.

joliveros

Review posted November 30, 2018

5

Excellent book. After watching the ACES video, this book answers some of the questions i had regarding the genesis of the ACES movement in a way that offered depth and logic. Whether in the field of Corrections or Education, this book is a must to establish a very sound framework for working with people.

leapfrog303

Review posted November 29, 2018

5

This was a very insightful book. I appreciated the author's focus and her real-life experiences that lent authenticity. I have recommended this book to every educator I know. This book address the kids we work with every day and every teacher needs to read it.

dustiny10

Review posted November 29, 2018

5

This is a great book to have in your resource library if you are looking for encouragement as well as some ideas of integrating services under one location. It is engaging and encouraging while recognizing the challenges being faced with working to address trauma.

Loriann848

Review posted November 4, 2018

4

A bit heavy of a read but well worth it. Much heartfelt and realistic information

Pamala Joy

Review posted October 31, 2018

5

I am so very grateful for having the opportunity to read "The Deepest Well" as I have a personal background which includes childhood neglect and abuse, and as well work with adults with similar issues. This book was both informational and inspirational, giving me new insights into the impact of unsound parenting and childhood issues. It will be a valuable reference book on my shelf for years to come, and has helped me greatly in coming to terms with my own pain from the past. I am so very inspired by Dr. Harris, who is doing a tremendous service for children now and in the future. I have talked to many people about this issue, encouraging them to read this very relevant and valuable book. Thank you for bringing this book to my attention and my library.

BookReader

Review posted October 29, 2018

5

Interesting account of adverse childhood experiences and the long term impact. Well worth the read.

Patricia Jarrett

Review posted October 24, 2018

5

This is a great book I’m a preschool teacher and I see little kids struggling every day due to childhood adversity and after reading the book I feel that I have more knowledge about what goes on in our bodies and I can help my students and their families better. Thank you!

deeann

Review posted October 16, 2018

5

Dr. Nadine Burke Harris provides a emotional and personal connection to the pervasive problem of ACEs in society. I appreciated her view that people who grew up with ACEs don't have to "overcome" their childhoods, just understand the impact it has on their health. Very informative and impactful book, a must read!

motten01

Review posted October 16, 2018

5

Fantastic read that is relevant to anyone working with children or families. I am a School Psychologist and I felt this book was incredibly relevant to my work and the work of my colleagues. It is well-written, clear, and very accessible. It offers clear guidance on what ACEs are, how to screen for ACEs, and steps to take to help people with ACEs (basically, anyone) to overcome their difficulties. I have recommended and lent this book to coworkers and others. I can't praise it highly enough.

heatherg

Review posted October 16, 2018

4

Great book. Deep content that is well written.

jgieger12

Review posted October 15, 2018

5

The Deepest Well offers first hand insight into Childhood Trauma from a medical and public health stand point. It offers not only personal insight that everybody can benefit from, but a challenge to the medical and community at large: how do we think about trauma and what are we going to do about it?. I recommend this book in conjunction with Body Keeps the Score, which looks at over all trauma on the body and brain.

HeidiVenture

Review posted October 13, 2018

5

Powerful. Heartbreaking. But also hopeful. There are things built into our brains and DNA that can help us get past trauma. If you think people "make bad choices" that lead to their poverty or other bad outcomes, read this book. Many bad choices are made for us by our trauma

KellyAnn

Review posted October 10, 2018

4

I learned a lot about childhood adversity and how to deal with it in clear and straightforwarde reading.

Lnoonan

Review posted October 1, 2018

5

Amazing insight for working with children

weschmidt56

Review posted September 27, 2018

4

Great book Good information and well put together

Tm41029

Review posted September 25, 2018

5

Very well written book! Really can relate to my life and seeing how things that happen in childhood can translate into future health issues. Really rises questions about how screening in childhood could directly effect the health outcomes of the growing child and later on adult. Hoping that the groundwork that has been done so far can move forward the help clinicians with screening and integrate it into standard practice. This was an eye opening book that shows the impact that can be had on our population if the right questions are asked and the correct care is given to a growing child.

russell_stephanie

Review posted September 25, 2018

5

This is a great read! I had seen Dr. Burke Harris' TED Talk several years ago. This book is a wonderful continuation that includes the backstory of her work around ACES and treatment. The book is well-written and easy to relate to. I highly recommend it for a new perspective on students struggling and how we can help to make them healthy for life.

bdeeds

Review posted September 24, 2018

5

I greatly appreciate your lending library! Thank you so much for this intriguing and inspiring book by Dr. Burke M.D. The author brings forth both awareness and hope for families and communities, and those listening. This insight has given me tools that will assist others in a healthier and healed future. Dr. Burke M.D. did an excellent job of describing the importance of bringing forth both the awareness of and providing the tools to mitigate the impacts of ACE outcomes in all populations. I enjoyed this audio version as it really captures her heart, intense compassion, and engaged me to stay attuned. I felt a deep sense of connection to her work and the individuals represented as it pertained to my work and my own self and family. I will utilize the 6 elements (S.H.E.N.M.M) of healing as we continue to screen and support children, families, staff, myself and our community.

shirleyblake

Review posted September 23, 2018

5

Great book to better understanding of ACEs. I wish every adult could read to understand why it's crucial to invest in our children.

PatriciaSnyder

Review posted September 22, 2018

5

I had been introduced to the ideas behind the ACE Study and wanted to learn more. This book provided a lot of details about the concepts and the medical connection to toxic stress and childhood experiences. It also suggests ways to counter the damage. It would be a good book for anyone in the medical or helping professions as well as for people who have children in their lives.

[email protected]

Review posted September 22, 2018

5

If you need evidence to help make the case for paying attention to ACES and how to overcome adversity this is it. Even better - its readable and engaging!

arbusch

Review posted September 19, 2018

5

Great overview of ACEs and how Nadine started a movement in Bayview

mkellner097

Review posted September 19, 2018

4

I loved this book...a fantastic read.

crhughes72

Review posted September 14, 2018

5

this was a very enlightening book. best if you don't have alot of unresolved trauma

ssepulveda

Review posted September 12, 2018

5

This was a very engaging read, filled with easy-to-digest information about the medical consequences of childhood trauma combined with descriptive stories and examples of kids and families who are dealing with the consequences, all of which helped bring the importance of this topic to light. I enjoyed reading about Dr. Harris' personal journey in discovering the link between a person's Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) score and their health, as well as hearing how this topic is starting to come to the forefront in public health initiatives. She also clearly demonstrated how this issue is important in all racial and socioeconomic spheres. As someone who works at an organization that serves often disadvantaged youth, I am thankful I can now better understand these links and also be reminded of how my friends, colleagues', and my own past experiences can affect our current and future health and well-being.

tracyj79

Review posted September 10, 2018

5

I hadn't known what the ACE's test was. This book was very enjoyable to read, with real life stories. I highly recommend!

joannmc3

Review posted September 7, 2018

5

I chose the audio version which was recorded by the author. Hearing her voice, her own life experiences, research and interventions made the content more profound. This information would benefit every person who has any connection to children, and ultimately help our children. Please share.

Lynn0608

Review posted September 6, 2018

5

The Deepest Well continually supported the change I have seen in 42 years of education by openly explaining what we as educators, see on a daily basis now in our classrooms. The research validates Dr. Harris’s experiences with her healing children in San Francisco. She explained the issues clearly and concisely so any layperson could understand the challenges our children face with trauma, short or long lived. Twice through listening to the audio and I’m learning and hearing new information. The Deepest Well offers all people an opportunity to understanding the societal changes we struggle to understand.

jessicaalonso333

Review posted August 29, 2018

5

I cannot recommend this book highly enough. First off, I am a graduate student who researches early childhood development, specifically children's classroom behavior when they have a parent that is incarcerated. Obviously, that means that each child I am studying has an ACE score and could be struggling with a variety of other risk factors. This book was not only an excellent read but it helped me further my own questions about what I could be doing to help my population. I would recommend this book to anyone who studies children, trauma, risky behavior, or any combination of these things. Learning from Nadine's journey of discovery can help us all move forward in our understanding of children with traumatic pasts.

mperss920

Review posted August 24, 2018

3

The narrative is wrapped around truly significant content; ACE studies are now at the forefront of medical practice as they should be. However, I felt like the author made too many attempts at comedic pandering which made for a confusing tone. This is still worth reading in spite of that, especially for those unfamiliar with ACEs.

Kimberly Gregory

Review posted August 23, 2018

5

I highly recommend this book, especially to those who work in the Human Services/Social Services/Sociology/Psychology related fields.

Soohma

Review posted August 23, 2018

5

The author gives a much deeper insight into the mind-body connection and how our early childhood experiences affect our biology and even our DNA. Our adverse childhood experiences impact our behavior, our ability to learn and our health, with some of the effects showing up much later in life. Studies show that a huge percentage of all the people on Earth have faced at least one toxic stress issue (Adverse Childhood Experience or ACE) and more than 10% have four or more of the possible ten stressors currently defined (Physical abuse, Sexual abuse, Emotional abuse, Physical neglect, Emotional neglect, Intimate partner violence.

Susan Heitkamp

Review posted August 22, 2018

5

I loved the practical use of the ACE study described in the book. My mind has been turning with ideas of how to integrate the information into my work. Great book!

artonya

Review posted August 20, 2018

5

The book gave great insight on ACEs

Dmoll

Review posted August 17, 2018

5

Engaging, compelling, I found in this book not only a great read, but answers to the questions I've had about my own childhood adversity and its effects on my adult life, as well as answers to how to heal the children in our society growing up with so many strikes against them. A very hopeful and well written book!

Nw1109

Review posted August 14, 2018

5

This was a very engaging read covering heavy subject material. It is amazing what resiliency that humans have, but we need to care for the children who have suffered trauma as well as the adults who suffered trauma as children.

constantinobenjamin

Review posted August 13, 2018

5

Having worked in student support services, having tools and knowledge to effectively support and mentor those students who have adverse childhood experiences or trauma is a critical skill. Students all have their own background and experiences, as mentors and role models, we need to be empathetic and supportive to ensure the student's personal success, whatever that may look like.

Kathe Linden

Review posted August 10, 2018

5

This was an excellent read, and very helpful for understanding how ACEs can impact the health and wellbeing of children throughout their lives. I hope the growing awareness around ACEs can lead to standardized screening for all children and the development of trauma informed care to address their mental and physical needs.

tkwilson

Review posted August 3, 2018

5

This doctor is amazing. I watched her TED talk on Neuroplasticity, it was amazing! She is so easy to listen to so I am grateful to have access to her book on ACE and look forward to reading her persective and of her experiences.

twillard

Review posted August 1, 2018

5

Very informative book about Dr. Nadine Burke Harris' journey discovering studies on childhood adversity and it's effects on lifelong health.

suemusico

Review posted July 28, 2018

5

This book was eye-opening to me even though I didn't personally suffer any adversity in my childhood. I wonder why the concepts aren't more widely used in the medical profession. I shall be talking about it to my own doctor next time I am in her office. Obviously, adversity isn't necessarily a bad thing because it can shape us into stronger human beings, but chronic and constant adversity can really mess up a kid who doesn't have a good supportive adult in his or her life.

lagrogan

Review posted July 23, 2018

5

This book is a must-read for those who work with children and families. The author clearly demonstrates the potential impacts of childhood trauma and presents a strong case for an interdisciplinary approach for working towards the health and well-being of any individual who has experienced chronic stress. She does an excellent job of demonstrating that ACEs are a universal problem but that there is hope and opportunity for healing. Thank you for the opportunity to have this book!

kimberlyt

Review posted July 11, 2018

5

Wow. This book provided me with so much insight. Thank you for providing this book

emeiliaf

Review posted July 9, 2018

5

If you work with any children having experienced childhood trauma this is a must read.

CindiJ

Review posted July 9, 2018

5

This book shows the strong connection between Adverse Childhood Experiences and health issues. These health issues are not only experienced during childhood, but often continue to show up in adulthood. The personal storytelling method the author uses helps readers to easily follow along and experience compassion for those who have undergone ACE. Not only is this book extremely informative, it is also very well written--It had me hooked from the introduction.

cmurphy

Review posted July 4, 2018

5

Engaging and insightful. Picked it up after it arrived thinking to just read the introduction. Couldn't put it down until I finished it that night. The first few chapters were rough reads and invoked more than a few tears, but once she starts to outline a vision for the future the book is substantially less distressing (so keep reading, you'll get through it). It has already led to some good discussions with family and friends and definitely encourages reflection and analyses of one's self and relationships.

Sarahhadley

Review posted July 2, 2018

4

I've long been a fan of Nadine's work and this book did not disappoint. It gives me great hope to see the truth of how external circumstances effect our internal health on the national stage. If you don't have time to read this book, at least check out her TED talk.

sforrest

Review posted July 2, 2018

4

This book comes from a medical perspective but does a beautiful job advocating for the necessity of multi-disciplinary cooperation to help buffer children from the effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences. I appreciated that although the book was singular in its perspective of the root cause of poor health outcomes, it does not oversimplify the solution and realistically talks about the intense commitment, cooperation and responsiveness required to counteract this problem. Overall, the book was very easy to read and enjoyable. As a social worker in a school system, it also provided several resources and ideas for how to bring an awareness of ACES into real practice.

cbazzi

Review posted July 1, 2018

4

Excellent presentation of an important topic. Understanding the trauma children experience guides those working with children to be able to help them more effectively. Good for both parents, family members, friends and professionals working with children. In addition policy makers and the public can learn from this book how to set community standards and guidelines for health and wellness.

dsmith

Review posted June 20, 2018

5

A must read for anyone who works with children. As a result of reading this book I have gained a better perspective in understanding children and how ACES affect their lives. It has changed my approach in my interactions with children and youth. Very education and enlightening, also, a good read!

iCindy

Review posted June 19, 2018

5

"Is it possible that the daily threat of violence and homelessness breathing down your back is the cause of obesity?" Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, M.D. says in some cases the answer is "Yes." And she'll back that up with research studies that the reader can follow up on themselves.

mandy.stanley

Review posted June 19, 2018

5

FANTASTC! I wish more people would take the time to read this.

Mrs. Weasley

Review posted June 18, 2018

5

I have learned so much from reading this book. Beyond the information, the author also has an excellent story telling style that keeps you invested and moving along with the narrative. The author has a good sense of when to stop and explain something and when to keep moving. To those who are on a personal quest to come to grips with childhood trauma, a caveat - some of this book will hurt. Keep with it and read it in small pieces. It will definitely help. It will also serve as a way to make the topic more approachable to those around you. To those who haven't experienced childhood trauma but are seeking to understand, this is a wonderful guide book for you. It personalizes the facts and figures into something relatable. I think teachers, social workers, medical workers and police should read this book. This book reminds us all that we should question why something is happening instead of just accepting that it does.

Moira McKenna

Review posted June 15, 2018

5

Wow. Nadine Burke Harris's book is compelling. Knowing her experience and expertise, as I read and engage with the narrative, allows me to more fully consider how to approach children/adolescents and families with a trauma-informed lens. Thank you Nadine Burke Harris, your work is greatly appreciated.

dfernandez

Review posted June 12, 2018

5

This is an excellent book! I had seen Dr. Burke Harris' TED talk several years ago and was excited to learn she had published a book on this topic. I work in early childhood education with children ages 0-5 and families who have experienced an average of six ACEs. While the ACE study has been out for years, it is now finally gathering the attention it deserves, and Dr. Burke Harris is helping to bring this to the mainstream. Everyone needs to read this book!

cskillings77

Review posted June 6, 2018

5

The Deepest Well is an amazing book that delves into the intricacy of childhood trauma and how it plays out throughout the lifespan and generationally. Dr. Burke-Harris is a witty writer and blends humor and anecdotes from her life and clinical practice with neurobiological information. Highly recommended!

forestpinegirl

Review posted June 4, 2018

5

This book was very helpful. Great insite.

krystlemoxley

Review posted June 2, 2018

4

A very informative read regarding child trauma. The inclusion of the Aces study along with real world, for hand stories, gives the reader an insider's look at how children are affected by adverse experiences and how we can bring about change, one family at a time.

[email protected]

Review posted June 1, 2018

5

Nadine Burke Harris, M.D brings warmth and a bit of humor to an issue that is neither warm nor humorous to discuss. It was enlightening to learn that the impact of childhood adversity can be ameliorated. I am talking about this book to everyone I know!

caitlin_espinoza

Review posted May 31, 2018

4

This book was very eye opening. It really delves into childhood adversity and how it can be measured universally by a simple test. Being able to measure adversity has serious implications not only in the medical field but in an education setting as well. As a teacher I feel like this book would be helpful, to other teachers, because it’s important to know what and how life experiences can negatively impact children and their growth and learning and how to remediate that. Overall this was an easy read and a very interesting book.

PCAO

Review posted May 31, 2018

5

In this book, Nadine Burke Harris presents about trauma and ACEs in a comprehensive and engaging manner for the reader. She is a brilliant and well-rounded doctor and educator. Although I have been learning as much as I can about toxic stress and children for several years now, this book contained new information that was incredibly useful. I plan to share the information I learned and will recommend this book whenever I can, so that others may benefit from this knowledge also.

oregonharriet

Review posted May 30, 2018

5

In my eyes, this book was extraordinary! Serendipitously, it was not only a fascinating read, it also paralleled the efforts and training of our trauma informed school. I believe this is a must read for every educator (and anyone, for that matter!). Dr. Nadine Harris shares her information in an engaging, clear approach and her passion about this subject simply jumps off the page. If you do not know what an ACE score is, or the lifelong impacts it can have, add this book to your list! This will be a book you keep for your personal collection!

amandamtstar

Review posted May 28, 2018

5

This was a great book! I watched Nadine’s TED talk which was amazing! Her book didn’t disappoint. If you are wanting to get an understanding of ACE’s this book is a must read!

[email protected]

Review posted May 26, 2018

5

This isn't a how-to book, but rather a vivid illustration of how childhood adversity affects us all. This is an inspiring book, especially for clinicians.

erincotrone

Review posted May 25, 2018

5

This book was so insightful to the traumas that can be caused by childhood adversity. This was actually recommended by someone after I ordered the book, but before I got it. Which I thought was crazy! Anyone who wants to learn about the affects that childhood stress can cause, should definitely read this book. The ACE test is in this book as well, which is why this book was recommended in the first place.

[email protected]

Review posted May 24, 2018

5

A must read. A true glimpse into how we can make lasting changes for the generations to come, by treating the whole child.

Beneventofam

Review posted May 14, 2018

5

Such a great read. You really get a better understanding and Difference in perspective after reading this book.

Donnamajames

Review posted May 14, 2018

5

Having been introduced to the ACEs training in the last year - it was a very good and interesting read! It is mind-blowing how many of us are suffering the effects of childhood trauma and adversity, I truly believe the more we are educated, the better off we are in helping one another to find compassion and understanding as well as turn the corner in finding the needed healing. It is a MUST for anyone who works with children in my opinion.

sahenderson

Review posted May 10, 2018

4

A must-read for anyone who treats people with ACEs! The book gives a history of how ACEs were connected to ill-health, what toxic stress does to the brain, advocates for universal screening for ACEs, and best practices for treating those with ACEs. But the title is a little misleading because there is no specific treatment for those with ACEs outside of psychotherapy, and doctors looking for diseases they may not have otherwise.

lkwarmels

Review posted May 6, 2018

5

What began as a preliminary reading on a Friday afternoon quickly turned into a weekend binge. It's Sunday night, I have finished the book and needed to share my love for it immediately. Nadine Burke Harris, M.D. has been doing work on the frontlines to better understand adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their contribution to toxic stress. This book shares what she has learned, how she has come to learn it, and the impacts ACEs have on not only an individual and family's health but also the public health of our entire world. As Dr. Harris points out, ACEs are not limited to low-income individuals or those of any particular race. According to one study mentioned in the book, 67% of people have experienced at least one ACE in their lifetime. I encourage you, the reader of this review, to take the quick, ten question "What's My ACE Score?" questionnaire then select this book. It will hit close to home no matter your score because undoubtedly you or someone you're close to is affected by toxic stress.

angiegraves

Review posted May 2, 2018

4

I really enjoyed this book. Being someone who suffered many child hood traumas this book helped me really understand myself more. Quite an easy read as well.

Andienicole

Review posted April 30, 2018

4

Provides a very good insight into how childhood factors play a role in a persons overall health in the long run.

retiredtom

Review posted April 24, 2018

5

This book is a "game changer" in our understanding of health, specifically the role of chronic stress related to early childhood adversity in sickness and treatment. Well written, even entertaining, the author makes clear that adversity is not just suffered by the poor, or minorities, but is shared by all races and classes (just covered up by some better than others). I applaud the foundation for making this book available.

Brownju

Review posted April 21, 2018

5

Best book read in years! The research is recent and information applicable to every community. Educators need to script the ACE test into every student's portfolio. Read this book and GO make a difference in your community!

DrStrait

Review posted April 15, 2018

5

Knowing this book would be highly important, I still found myself awed in just how effective a book it is in teaching, persuading and impacting me! I believe every physician, educator, law maker, community member and parent should sit down and read this book. As a Pediatrician, I have even an greater determination to screen, intervene, prevent and mitigate the consequences of ACEs. Thank you for such a wonderful book Dr. Nadine Burke-Harris!

stwellman

Review posted April 9, 2018

5

This is an excellent addition to my Culture of Care resources for myself and other staff members to use.

Sebastian

Review posted April 8, 2018

5

One of the most insightful books I've ever read on the impact that childhood trauma can have on adult health. The author argues, convincingly, that the connection of body and mind is inextricably linked to the outcomes of health. A very good read that I highly recommend.

ACunnington

Review posted March 31, 2018

5

This book was excellent! Nadine Burke Harris uses storytelling and explains ACEs and toxic stress in a way that is easy to understand. Everyone needs to hear this message. I am recommending it to everyone I know!

danagoodale

Review posted March 20, 2018

5

I work in a high school as a School Social Worker and this was a GREAT read that is very tied into my career. It gave me good insight into ways I can explain ACEs and their affects to my co-workers who don't have the same educational background as I do. Nadine's TED talks are always enjoyable, but this was an excellent way to dive deeper into the material and come away with a better understanding of how important positive relationships are in the lives of our youth.