The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study

How Are the Findings Being Applied in Oregon?

A landmark study demonstrated strong links between Adverse Childhood Experiences and a host of adult problems. In this 16-page report, author David Mandell explores how the study is informing work with children and families in Oregon.

16 pages. ©2014.
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Reader Reviews for this Book

Katrina Dean

Review posted November 16, 2017

2

I am a CASA in Lane County. I read The Ford Family Foundation's published brochure "the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study." The articles discuss what is being done in Oregon to address ACE's in various counties and across three areas: education, health, and early childhood. It is a concise summary, albeit outdated; the survey was done in 2011, the results compiled in 2013. I found it interesting, but with too much governmental "double-speak." Agencies have a wonderful ability to say many words with little or no application and content.

Sheryl M

Review posted November 2, 2017

1

The same information was repeated several times throughout the entire publication. I would have rather seen actual case scenarios and/or more specifics on implementation practices of the ACE study as it pertains to at risk populations.

Mavrose

Review posted September 24, 2017

5

This was a very small booklet, but very informative. I work for one of the larger CCO's in state, and we do quarterly training for all staff on ACES. I was aware before, because I had a traumatic background that affected his child differently. I am glad this is finally being recognized. Today given the assault on workers and economic stability, so many are traumatized. That of course effects the future. We have more in common than separates us.

[email protected]

Review posted August 31, 2017

4

good information but a lot shorter than I had expected. Is a short pamphlet.

AmyRoseWoot

Review posted August 24, 2017

5

Such useful information

dspackman

Review posted August 23, 2017

3

The discussion of ACE's in Oregon is fine. The problem is it was published in 2014 and so very much has changed across all sectors since then. Trauma Informed Oregon came into existence after this article was written.

jpaul

Review posted August 20, 2017

5

This was interesting, and it opens up a lot of questions as to how we are handling poverty in Oregon.

Cesie Delve Scheuermann

Review posted August 1, 2017

5

This excellent, compact report is going to be very helpful to me. The research is critically important and it has led me to additional research about child abuse and prevention strategies. Who knew that the University of Oregon had a Center for the Prevention of Abuse and Neglect? Great information!

jkwong07

Review posted June 29, 2017

5

This research is beneficial for any individual in the helping field (educators, counselors, therapists) or involved in trauma-informed practices. I have read the Kaiser ACE study and I love that this study focuses specifically on Oregon practices and implementation.

Jmays

Review posted June 1, 2017

5

This study provides a needed and useful overview of how our state was incorporating the ACEs study in a diversity of areas up to 2014. As someone just beginning to delve deeply into trauma-informed care in my job, it was very helpful to see where we started and to reflect on where we have yet to go. Very concise with input from a great variety of community/state agencies.

jawaugh

Review posted May 31, 2017

3

Well written - worth a read if you work with students in a school setting.

[email protected]

Review posted May 26, 2017

4

This document shared the work happening across Oregon related to ACE's. This is a great summary for teachers to review as schools begin to embark on the journey of becoming Trauma Informed. This document helps provide background on what other areas have focused on these efforts in Oregon.

Paatkins

Review posted May 2, 2017

5

great read

rosemignano

Review posted March 30, 2017

5

I found this book very helpful and would recommend it to all educators, early childhood professionals and parents. Thank you, Ford Family Foundation, for providing this title in the Select Books program!

Rob Haley Hueckman

Review posted March 23, 2017

5

This was very helpful in helping us with the our trauma informed committee!

tkwilson

Review posted January 19, 2017

5

good information in case you are just curious to know

PatriciaSnyder

Review posted November 27, 2016

4

I read this because I wasn't able to attend a recent local ACES presentation. It gives a good overview of the concepts and how they're being addressed. I would have liked to have seen a breakdown of each of the ACE factors and ideas for addressing each. I hope efforts continue to develop and look forward to a follow-up report.

cmoan

Review posted November 2, 2016

5

I have heard so much about Aces but haven't had an opportunity to learn more about it personally. I appreciated this easy to read and use summary. This will not only help me to grow as a professional, but will also aid me in talking with others about Aces.

kburnett

Review posted October 31, 2016

4

Succinct overview of the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, as well as a good synopsis of how this is being used in Oregon to shape health care.

RoseRobin

Review posted October 6, 2016

4

I have been deeply impacted by learning about the ACEs study. This booklet breaks down Oregon's approach to this research. Having resources such as this created by TFFF is invaluable.

gabelgl

Review posted September 29, 2016

5

This report is well balanced. Not only in identifying the ADEs but more importantly identifying the resilency and strengths in families. It leaves me much less despondant, and realizing there is hope but we are just beginning.

szuercher

Review posted September 26, 2016

4

The ACE Study is a huge breakthrough in how we approach trauma, how those people who have experienced trauma are impacted throughout the lifespan. This book is a very broad synopsis of the elements of the study. I believe this review is valuable both personally and professionally and everyone should read it.

C Mallette

Review posted September 26, 2016

5

This information is a powerful tool for helping people to understand the effects of violence on children and make a connection between making moms safe and protecting children.

kkmram

Review posted May 9, 2016

5

Excellent study with lots of information that can be used in staff and volunteer training, community outreach and grant writing. Great resource.

[email protected]

Review posted April 8, 2016

2

This summary of the ACE Study and how it is being used in Oregon is just that- a summary. The booklet was certainly a testament to Kaiser Permanente's efforts, and a valuable example of the Ford Family Foundation's work to connect research with reform. However, most of the observations and conclusions didn't go below the surface of ACES; the booklet did not offer many resources or examples for learning more about how ACE research is being used in the state.

retiredtom

Review posted April 7, 2016

4

Insightful. Good to see applications. Brief. Passed it on to others in the family.

sarahmweber

Review posted March 29, 2016

4

Short and sweet. Good info, but didn't necessarily learn anything new.

gstavio

Review posted February 12, 2016

4

WOW!!! Working with students as a community Liaison, then in Early Childhood, and now as a meal specialist one forgets to stop and think before one asks a question to a parent or child. This book made me, once again, to think carefully before asking questions that might open up old wounds. One sometimes gets all caught up in asking the questions that are set up in a questionnaire, that we forget to stop and actually listen. I am know more aware of how a question can open up all wounds, but now I make sure that I stop and I am prepare, in case the questions I ask opens up a wounds, than I have a resource, or be prepare to find a resource...I passed this book around and had all our Early Child assessment teams read it.

clambarth

Review posted January 5, 2016

4

This report provides a good overview of ACEs-informed work underway in Oregon through service provision and system transformation. Preliminary data on prevalence of ACEs in Oregon and examples of trauma-informed work is also useful. The 7 shared principles outlined provide a helpful framework for understanding systems transformation and application of the ACE Study statewide.

Tshelton

Review posted December 1, 2015

3

I thought this was an interesting book considering the huge discussion on the mental health community about ACES. I think however the study itself has some limitations. It doesn't take into account the trauma adult are exposed to later in life.

kimdeck

Review posted November 19, 2015

5

I enjoyed this concise and well written report as I was searching for information to gain an understanding about the ACE Study as it applies to my work in Oregon. Exactly what I needed -- thank you!

jordanjungwirth

Review posted November 15, 2015

4

I am a full supporter of workplace development surrounding trauma informed care and the ACES framework. This report showed interesting applications here in Oregon, and I am primarily excited to read more on ACES applied to educational programs and communities supporting schools.

[email protected]

Review posted November 13, 2015

4

Really appreciate the Ford Family Foundation pulling together information for "The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study: How are the Findings Being Applied in Oregon?" by David Mandell. We often talk about the ACE study and agree to it's significance, but haven't had data as to what is happening in Oregon. I found this information helpful and will utilize in future planning projects.

Natalie

Review posted October 23, 2015

3

This report was beneficial to me as it made me more aware of different organizations and agencies working within the field of child welfare here in Oregon. The downside is that is mostly said, "We're working on it..." and "in the future." There's nothing happening, it appears, at the state level to address these adverse child experiences findings. Some counties are doing good work, which is great, but there's no widespread push to get things off the ground. I like the idea of early childhood, health, and education systems all working together, as the report suggests is happening, but again, there seems no urgency there.

smischke

Review posted October 14, 2015

4

This is very interesting and thought provoking for those of us who work with youth. It is a validation of many ideas about youth and their upbringing.

arbusch

Review posted October 14, 2015

5

Great overview of this study.

roxannajolly

Review posted September 29, 2015

5

As as new child welfare worker and therapist in training (CSWA), I knew this report would be incredibly helpful. The main thing I learned is that we can help clients heal by both establishing relationships with them and by understanding the impact that trauma has on their lives. We hear the age old adage that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, however, we know that the earlier we can intervene, the more we can bridge clients to the services they need to process and/or mitigate their trauma. I appreciate having a better understanding of how the findings are being applied in the state and look forward to incorporating this knowledge into my own practice as well.

mdevore

Review posted September 8, 2015

5

Very interesting and thought provoking publication.

Summer

Review posted August 7, 2015

5

Descriptive and short. Maybe too short.... It sparked an interest in learning more.

willeford_h

Review posted April 28, 2015

4

Very helpful information both personally and professionally.

Lwhite8

Review posted April 9, 2015

5

While I had heard about the ACES through my work, I had not previously studied it. This is a useful tool when working in trauma informed care.

betz

Review posted March 19, 2015

4

I gained information needed while working w/ youth in our community.

jujugo

Review posted March 19, 2015

2

I rated this report so low because it has to be the hardest thing to understand I've ever read - and I have a pretty decent brain and command of the English language. It could have been said so much simpler. And while I finally got the gist of what David Mandell was saying, what he was saying about us not being ready to go forward with implementation of the ACE findings was too important to be said in a way that was hard to comprehend.

KGormand

Review posted March 17, 2015

5

Very interesting I had no idea.

jamieswafford

Review posted March 13, 2015

4

I didn't know when I began reading this book that it would be about me. I'm so glad to know about all the organizations that are working toward helping children who are abused or have other Adverse Experiences. I work at a hospital district and am aware of the CCO's CAC's and learning Hubs. But, I didn't know how they all connected - or could connect in the future. It helps make sense out of all the changes that are occurring in Oregon at this time. Thank you for doing this study. I'm passing the book on to the CEO of Lower Umpqua Hospital to let her know about your work in this area.

kristoffer.molloy

Review posted March 13, 2015

5

A short read but will continue to be a useful and shared resource with my colleagues.

branzei

Review posted March 9, 2015

4

Very slim and quick to read. I found it interesting and wished it had more background information. I passed it on to my niece, who is working with troubled teens in Southern Oregon.

dlynnmw

Review posted February 26, 2015

4

This report is very detailed but relatively easy for a layperson to understand. Very useful background information.

Redith.K

Review posted February 15, 2015

5

Short and informative version of a study I have not read YET but now will. I am a volunteer EMT and ambulance driver and I had thought the information would be helpful in understand and caring for the children in trauma that I come across. It explained a lot and now I definitely will take the time to research the full report. At some future time it will likely be part of one of our monthly training classes. Thank You and I look forward to reading another of your selected books.

taharris70

Review posted February 9, 2015

4

The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study booklet was very interesting. I work as a Family Advocate at an elementary school. I work with students who have had a lot of trauma and who are currently experiencing trauma. The study stressed the importance of prevention and resiliency. I teach Community Character Building classes, which teach students how to develop their character. It also teaches students how to be kind to each other and strategies to do when they have strong feelings. My daughter is a social work major. She enjoyed the booklet as well.

iseesunshine

Review posted February 7, 2015

4

I appreciate this publication by Ford Family Foundation of this important data so that work on Oregon's policies working with children and families can continue to be informed. The ACE study is a vehicle that I hope can bring together independent resources with common goals to strengthen the efforts exponentially. Important to read this to get a sense of the territory a collaboration will impact.

Rowe5754

Review posted January 29, 2015

5

The ACE Study was very interesting, and I'm excited to see it practically applied across health and human service sectors. Th educational opportunities alone can significantly impact delivery of such services, and is a starting point to further engage the community at large.

mbayley

Review posted January 29, 2015

5

It is my opinion that David Mandell has hit upon the root of the problem that plagues our public classrooms. In the report, The Adverse Childhood Experience Study, it is made clear that trauma suffered in the early developmental years of a child have lasting effects on the health and well-being of that individual. As a person who had worked for over ten years in the public education system. The number one question is “How do we educate children who are suffering from mental and emotional trauma?” The public education system is not set up to handle these types of students in a regular sized classroom of 30 pupils. So, they often fall into the cracks or are carted into a special education program. I agree with the study that we need to focus our attention on prevention and early intervention to help families connect and receive assistance to build and achieve resiliency for their families. There are many grass-root efforts here in Oregon, these are just a few: Head Start, S.M.A.R.T. reading programs, mentor grandparents, and community volunteers. These efforts are a step in the right direction but, if we are unable to get at the underlying cause of the problem(s), this will only be seen as another on-going problem without an end. By placing resources of time, money, and manpower along with the data collected in the Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) study. We can make a shift in our state to having productive students, families, and later down the line-healthy adults. This must be a “community-wide” effort to help rural families and children, so that they can access the resources and early interventions to promote health resiliency in children. As, the African proverb states: “It takes a village to raise a child.” We, the citizens of Oregon, must be that village.

Moonshiner

Review posted January 28, 2015

4

This study is very timely and informative, as Oregon goes through the its "Great Transformation" in three of its largest service delivery systems that impact children an families: health, education and early childhood. As a member of the Community Advisory Council (CAC) of a CCO, we are tasked with aligning our strategies with the Early Learning Hubs. This study was shared with the CAC. As this study points out, use of the ACES study in Oregon is in its infancy. It would be great to see a follow-up to this in a few years.

Linda Kirk

Review posted January 26, 2015

5

Clearly written explanation of a compelling topic. The book reminds me that we can work together to improve children's resiliency.

gaylesetsuko

Review posted January 26, 2015

1

Most helpful information about the need for trauma informed care. Makes onbe wonder about AFE and cultural trauma, undocumented workers, deportation of families, WWII incarceration of Japanaes Amercinas, Holocoust expereinces

alexandrastromquist

Review posted January 23, 2015

5

This book had a very informative message regarding adverse effects of trauma on young children and what the expected outcomes could be. Very helpful.

Jackie LaBonte

Review posted January 14, 2015

5

The statistics were enlightening..This study has identified the importantance of building bridges betwen health, education and human resources so these agencies can work together in the effort for successful outcomes for longterm health and social outcomes for people who have suffered a childhood trauma.

FrankBetzer

Review posted December 26, 2014

5

As a layperson in the field, I found the report to be an excellent tool that makes the ACE Study understandable and relevant for volunteers, supporters and non-professional staff.

kathy pecchioni graham

Review posted December 3, 2014

3

The study is very easy to read literature & organized well to follow findings. Perhaps more specific examples of applications would make it more community friendly.