The Ford Family Foundation is partnering with 11 nonprofits across Oregon and in Siskiyou County, Calif., to offer the Protect Our Children program.
Volume XVII | Issue 1 | Spring 2017
Cover Story

The statistics are staggering — one in 10 children experience some form of sexual abuse before they turn 18. And studies have shown that consequences don’t stop with the abuse, which has been linked to adverse health, mental and societal issues later in life.

It’s an issue that is of paramount importance in building healthy communities. There is no magic solution to preventing child sexual abuse, but experts agree that education is key. 

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Community Vitality is published twice a year (in a printed format and online) for community leaders by The Ford Family Foundation.

Anne Kubisch, President; Nora Vitz Harrison, Editor; Megan Monson, Assistant Editor.

The purposes of this publication are to share information about building communities; to encourage individual development; to increase awareness of resources; and to share success stories. Please help us make this publication a valuable resource by sharing your comments or ideas. The views expressed by the authors in bylined articles are not necessarily the views of the Foundation.

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Working to prevent child sexual abuse

The statistics are staggering — one in 10 children experience some form of sexual abuse before they turn 18. And studies have shown that consequences don’t stop with the abuse, which has been linked...  Read More

Community Builders

When the Ford Institute for Community Building made the commitment to move from leadership development to community development two years ago, the focus began to shift to community builders. “We have...  Read More

Creating a vision

Almost 20 years ago, community leaders in the Illinois Valley embarked on a process they hope will never end. It’s the process of community visioning, or developing consensus among residents about...  Read More

Rural infrastructure

When the northwestern Oregon city of Vernonia suffered catastrophic flooding in both 1996 and 2007, the town’s infrastructure took a big hit. The flooding inundated the city’s water treatment lagoons...  Read More

Golden Spots

Art isn’t easy. An inspirational environment can help, and providing this space for Oregon artists is the goal of The Ford Family Foundation’s Golden Spot residency program.  The program provides...  Read More

Tax relief

Filling out this year’s tax return may be a little less painful for some filers, thanks to the Earned Income Tax Credit. Aimed at low- to moderate-income working people, the EITC is a federal income...  Read More

Call 211

When tsunami debris began coming ashore on Oregon’s coast, residents were encouraged to report sightings by calling 211, an information hotline that connects callers with resources of all kinds. When...  Read More

Undocumented students

Every year, The Ford Family Foundation’s Scholarship Office receives calls from school counselors and students asking if undocumented students can apply. Until this year, the answer was no. In order...  Read More

Scholar profile

In March of 1995, 20-year-old single mom Amy Van Wey was in debt and alone, living with her newborn son in a school bus in the Little Applegate Valley. “It was not a great combination,” she says....  Read More

Apps for parents

The first few years of a child’s life provides an all-important foundation for future learning. For parents seeking to make the most of early childhood can now find help — as close as their phone....  Read More

Book Review: Transforming trauma

The title of child psychiatrist Bruce Perry’s book, The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog, promises a compelling read — and it delivers. In each of his 12 page-turning chapters, Perry draws on his years of...  Read More

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